The Home-Care Process

The Home-Care Process

Throughout my career in the home care industry, I have seen and worked with many companies. Although, not all are alike we all are working towards the same goals. Matching a care provider to a client can be a frustrating process if the lines of communication are not clear. Having a care provider and client work together for years and bond with family is the goal in the care-giving/home-care process.
The first call my office usually received in starting the care process is regarding getting some care in the home for a loved one. This is usually a spouse or children of the loved one. After several questions that are asked regarding care needed from my office, the caller usually asks, “What is the cost?” Most if not all companies are not wanting to negotiate a price over the telephone. There are several reasons for this. For myself, I am an independent in the home-care industry. I am not connected to a Franchise so therefore I am not reaching to bring in a certain number to be meet those fees. My goal is to meet with you, your family and see what I can do to help enrich the life of the loved one. I look at hours needed, if there is transportation involved, time spent on finding the perfect match (care provider) for the family, assessing whether it is either a more companionship case rather than a more extensive personal care case-this tells me that I need to look for care with either of these backgrounds in care. So, as you can see, a phone call is just a phone call. Setting a free in-home care assessment is not binding for the consumer. If anything, it can be informative.
Once we are in the home and going over the assessment this is when we go over the expectations you have of the care that will be coming into the home. Examples of duties you wish to have-light housekeeping, transportation, meal preparation, personal care-this includes showers and grooming or toileting care. Is there any lifting involved? Is the client combative due to illness of Dementia? Language barrier? Diet restrictions? Is there durable medical equipment in the home? So, as you can see it would behoove the potential client to take that hour and meet with a representative. He or she may choose not to go with the company but at least they leave that meeting more enlightened on in-home care and the process. There are several documents that the client will need to sign. Home-care, if licensed by the state, must follow Agency for Healthcare Administration (AHCA) guidelines and we all have the same forms that need to be in the clients file.
Once we have gone thru the paperwork and have been able to get to know each other on a more personable level this is when the potential client must make sure she lets the representative know who mom or dad may work with better when it comes to a caregiver. This is key. Will dad work better with a male since personal care is involved? Will mom prefer a female helping her with errands around the home? With this process home-care transition can be an easy one. Home-care does not have to be a revolving door of care providers or the care provider never showing up for work. Your care provider is a direct reflection of the company you choose to work with. I am involved completely with the care received by my clients. I am the owner and take pride in knowing the clients I am serving are receiving quality care. I refer well trained, documented, background screened care providers.
Kathleen Lewis
Third Act In Homecare

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